NZIFF 2018: More Features to Watch from DEGNZ Members

She Shears

The full Auckland programme for the New Zealand International Film Festival has been officially unveiled and we are very excited for what’s ahead. Wellington follows suit with a programme launch at 7pm tonight.

In part 1, we spotlighted four features from our members amongst the festival’s Early Announcements. Here, we roundup four more from our talented members to look forward to at NZIFF.

Auckland tickets are on sale from Friday 9am and Wellington from 5 July. For info on other centres around the nation, check out the NZIFF website.

She Shears – Director Jack Nicol

World Premiere

In DEGNZ member Jack Nicol’s documentary, five female sheep shearers take on the competition at the Golden Shears in a sport where men and women compete together. NZIFF writes, “Jack Nicol applies camera poetry to the agility, strength, skill and rhythmic grace of women wielding blades of steel.”

“What we wanted to do was show off the shearing world and the shearing community in a way it’s never been seen before.” — Jack Nicol, interview with The Country.

Read more  >

She Shears

SHE SHEARS / Photo: Rebecca McMillan

 

Dog’s Best Friend – Director Eryn Wilson

NZ Premiere

After discovering online the work of Jacob Leezak, Sydney founder of the Canine Behaviour Expert Dog Psychology Centre, thanks to his mum, DEGNZ member Eryn Wilson saw the opportunity he had been looking for to direct his first feature-length documentary. Dog’s Best Friend is a tender film about the troubled dogs taken in at this centre and the couple who have made rehabilitating them their life’s work.

“Between them they’re so empathetic … you imagine a couple of humans that have experienced damage that they’re working through, and here are these damaged dogs. It’s no coincidence that they’ve taken on this kind of work.”
– Eryn Wilson, on The Project.

Read more  >

Dog's Best Friend

DOG’S BEST FRIEND / Photo: Irma Calabrese

 

Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen – Consulting Editor Annie Collins

World Premiere

Beginning in the late 70s, editor and DEGNZ board member Annie Collins collaborated with Merita Mita on four documentaries that included The Bridge (1982) and Patu! (1983). Annie contributes to a new documentary on Merata Mita’s life as consulting editor.

Merata Mita, pioneering Māori filmmaker and international champion of women in indigenous film, is celebrated by her son Heperi Mita in this richly personal portrait.

Read more  >

Merata

MERATA / Photo: Gil Hanly

 

Mega Time Squad – Editor Luke Haigh

NZ Premiere

DEGNZ member Luke Haigh (Hunt for the Wilderpeople) has three editing credits – one feature, two shorts – in this year’s NZIFF.

Playing in the Incredibly Strange section, Mega Time Squad (dir. Tim van Dammen) is a high-meets-low mash up of Kiwi humour, sci-fi and mad cap crime thriller about a small-town criminal who stumbles on a mystical artefact with time travelling powers.

Read more  >

Mega Time Squad

MEGA TIME SQUAD / Blur and Sharpen, Candlelit Pictures

Call for Screenwriters with Projects

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Speed Pitching - DEGNZ Women Filmmakers Incubator

DEGNZ is running the Women Filmmakers Incubator again in 2018 with eight talented, emerging women filmmakers: Chantelle Burgoyne, Linda Darby-Coring, Hiona Henare, Abi King-Jones, Agnes Peel-McGregor, Lauren Porteous, Michelle Savill and Asuka Sylvie.

The New Zealand Writers Guild (NZWG) and DEGNZ are issuing this call for mid to experienced level screenwriters of either guild to pitch their feature film projects to these directors in Workshop 3 of the Incubator.

There are eight writer spaces available. Each screenwriter will have ten minutes to pitch their project to the directors, with the directors pitching themselves back to the screenwriters.

The speed dating session for the pitching will take place on Monday 30 July 2018 in Kingsland, Auckland. Details on the venue will be provided to the successful applicants.

Applications to include the following

  • A short biography of the screenwriter (and producer if attached)
  • A one-pager of the project
  • A script or a treatment/outline
  • Contact details for the applicant incl. contact phone number and email

Project guidelines

A feature length idea that has been through any form of development. Projects that have complete scripts or detailed treatments/outlines will be accepted. A project can have one rejection through the NZFC EDF pathway. A project with two rejections is ineligible.

All applicants must be a member of either NZWG or DEGNZ.

All applications and queries to be sent through to alice@nzwritersguild.org.nz

Deadline for screenwriter applications: 20 July 2018

What: Women Filmmakers Incubator – Speed dating pitching session for 8 screenwriters with feature length projects.
When: Monday 30 July 2018
Where: Kingsland, Auckland

Table Read – Submissions Open for Round 3

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Table Reads Logo

Bringing Writers, Directors & Actors together

A core cast – max. six actors – together with a writer & director team OR writer/director will collaborate on each script-in-development table read.

Submit a full-length draft feature film script for your name to go into the draw for a day-long table read (names remain for subsequent draws).

The script must have a director attached and have been through a development process.

Table Read #3

When: Sat 11 August, 10am – 2pm
Venue: NZWG HQ, 400C Great North Road, Grey Lynn, Auckland

How to Submit

WRITER & DIRECTOR TEAM (OR WRITER/DIRECTOR): Submit script via email to GuildHQ@nzwg.org.nz. Either/both must be a member(s) of NZWG/DEGNZ.

ACTORS: Register via Eventbrite. Actors must be a member of Equity to apply.

Round Closes: Mon 23 July 

 

Four Table Reads per year on Saturdays @ NZWG HQ in Grey Lynn.

A joint initiative brought to you by:
NZWG, DEGNZ & Equity Foundation
With warm thanks to the New Zealand Film Commission

Is it Time to be a Union?

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View from the Top banner

In 2000, the Guild, which is an incorporated society, discussed whether or not to become a craft union when the Labour Government passed the Employment Relations Act making collective bargaining possible. However, because the majority of Guild members continued to see themselves as freelance operators, there was never unified support for unionisation.

The Hobbit Law introduced in 2010 categorised all film workers as contractors, further preventing film workers from collective bargaining as contractors are unable to access collective bargaining mechanisms currently.

In the independently run DEGNZ membership survey of 2016, nearly 83 percent of the membership said that they would be interested in DEGNZ negotiating collective agreements with minimum rates and conditions on their behalf.

Earlier this year, Minister of Workplace Relations and Employment Iain Lees-Galloway gave The Film Industry Working Group (FIWG), which DEGNZ is participating in, the objective of making recommendations to the Government on changes to the regulatory framework for film industry workers to restore the rights of film production workers to collectively bargain in a way that:

  • Allows film production workers who wish to continue working as individual contractors to do so;
  • Provides certainty to encourage continued film investment in New Zealand by film production companies; and
  • Maintains competition between businesses offering film production services to promote a vibrant, strong and world-leading industry.

Now in 2018, we see the nurses engaged in collective negotiations, former prime minister Jim Bolger appointed to head the Fair Pay working group, and the FIWG some months into the task that Lees-Galloway set it.

Labour relations are coming full circle as is clearly obvious just from the newspaper headlines.

Unionisation has been on the DEGNZ board’s mind for more than the last two years, primarily because of deteriorating terms and conditions and rates of pay for directors and editors, even though many of our members are still contractors.

Do we need to unionise? Not necessarily. We are a craft guild and the representative body for working directors and editors in New Zealand. As long as we are endorsed as such by our membership and officially recognised by industry and government in our role, we are well positioned to continue to advocate, lobby and represent those who chose us to do so.

Internationally, the Directors Guild of America has long been a union. In Australia, the Australian Directors Guild became a union in 2014. Directors UK is both a collection society and a non-profit organisation like us that represents directors’ interests there. The Screen Directors Guild of Ireland is also not a union. What are the pluses and minuses you ask? So far we haven’t discovered anything that massively swings the pendulum either way. But we would like to hear your opinions. Does DEGNZ need to be a union to represent you?

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director

Wellington Screenlink: Importance of Cast in the Current Climate

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Screenlink banner

DEGNZ, SPADA and Equity NZ warmly welcomes members to join us for a Screenlink in Wellington.

At this discussion and networking event, NZ Film Commission CEO Annabelle Sheehan will share on the importance of cast in today’s feature film climate. Annabelle’s background includes serving from 2004-2013 as CEO and Senior Agent at RGM Artist Group, representing high profile Australian artists in the entertainment industry.

WHEN  Tue 3 July, 6 – 8PM. Talk kicks off at 6:30PM
WHERE  Henry Pollen’s, Level 2, 100 Willis St, Wellington

Cash Bar // Nibbles provided

DEGNZ, SPADA & Equity members – Free
Non-members – $5 koha appreciated