We are really pleased to share with our members our latest standard agreement.

We have designed the Standard Feature Film Editing Agreement to establish fair terms and conditions between editors and producers.

Now available to members under Resources. Please make sure that you read and understand the Guild’s accompanying advice before using the standard agreement:

Before using it, please read ALL of the agreement carefully so that you understand it.

It is made available in MS Word format so that you can enter the basic information and present it to the engager (producer).

In negotiating your terms and conditions with the engager, you or they will insert or change the text and or terms and conditions of the agreement. Such changes will vary the document away from this standard agreement template. You MUST ALWAYS note where those changes are made and understand them, as they could weaken your terms and conditions. The Track Changes function in MS Word is useful for this but you or the engager may not use it.

Before signing your agreement, make a FULL AND DETAILED comparison against the standard agreement so that you know where any changes have been made.

Last updated on 28 September 2021

View from the Top banner

DEGNZ President Howard Taylor signs off.

I am retiring from my role as president of the DEGNZ. Going, but not quite gone. As required by the constitution, I will be continuing as a board member for another year to ensure a smooth transition.

I regard being on the Board of the Guild an honour and a privilege. It is also a lot of work – as my fellow board members will attest. However, I believe that giving back in this way to the industry that has given me such a wonderful career is the least we can do.

I have been on the Board since we set the Guild up 25 years ago and I have been president for five years. I turned the role down twice because I felt, rightly or wrongly, that while I had spent a lifetime in the world of television, I was not familiar enough with the film world. That changed when, having written a feature film screenplay, I took part in a year-long course in international co-production of features. The new-found knowledge gave me the confidence to finally say yes to the role of president.

I am a great believer in Guilds and the role they play in the industry. The lobbying we do on our members behalf is very often unseen. There is a tendency for government and industry bodies like the NZFC to listen to producers and either forget the creatives or assume that producers speak for everyone. The voice of the director (and editor) in the debates that arise is vital.

While it would be wonderful for us all to have the freedom implied by the fact that film is an artform, we are constrained by the pressures of the commercial world. Those pressures impact us directly as an erosion of conditions and fees. The Guild has a key role in protecting what we currently have and promoting improvements. This will be tested when we put on our Union hat and go into negotiation with SPADA to negotiate minimum rates and conditions as set out in the new Screen Industry Worker legislation.

The Guild’s role in providing education and skills training to members is important in an industry where most training is for beginners.

Directors live in silos. It’s many years since I was on another director’s set. Watching other directors work is a valuable learning experience and it’s great the DEGNZ can give directors (and editors) that opportunity.

What I value most is the sense of fraternity that Guild membership brings. We look after each other. Yes, we are competitors for jobs, but in my experience the willingness of directors and editors to lend a hand to their fellows trumps any sense of competition. Guild membership gives me a sense of connectedness to the screen industry that I have never found anywhere else.

The Guild has evolved hugely over the years, becoming a sophisticated organisation dealing with a plethora of active issues. I am proud of what the Guild has achieved and look forward to its robust and noisy future. Kia kaha.

Howard Taylor
(Ex.) President

Last updated on 23 September 2021

Director Kathy McRae (DEGNZ) and her team are independently funding a feature documentary that dives deeper into themes explored in Water Baby, their Loading Docs short film.

Water Baby (2019) documented freediving couple Sachiko Fukumoto and William Trubridge’s quest to have a water birth in the ocean. The short documentary has been watched by around 8 million people and is used by educators around the world, motivating expecting parents to explore birthing options

Its sequel, Pacific Mother, will explore the disconnection between the global default maternity system and the needs of families. The filmmaking team are running a live Kickstarter campaign to help them raise NZD 30,000 to help finish the film, including telling the story of Aotearoa’s maternity system.

In Pacific Mother, Sachiko travels from Japan to Hawaii, Tahiti, the Cook Islands and New Zealand to connect with strong ocean women, whose interwoven stories about birth and parenthood inspire a more traditional, connected way of life.

Please support Kathy McRae’s film if you can! Find more information about Pacific Mother on their Kickstarter page. Their fundraising campaign has 19 days remaining.

Director Kathy McRae and producer Migiwa Ozawa in Hawai’i before Covid-19 shut the borders in 2020.

Last updated on 8 October 2021

Celebrating filmmakers of great web series content from across the globe, NZ Web Fest returns this year with a line-up that includes works from DEGNZ members.

100 Year Forecast

100 Year Forecast (pictured above) is a five-part documentary series from The Spinoff exploring what we know about climate change, the implications it will have on Aotearoa New Zealand and what we can do moving forward. The series was cut by DEGNZ member Ben Chesters.

The Collective

Rachale Davies’ The Collective is an eight-part doco series about six young musicians taking part in a youth music programme that pushes them into compelling journeys of self-discovering.

Chloe and the Crash Test

Selected for the Pilot category is Chloe and the Crash Test, an original comedy series from Mt Maunganui directed by Anton Steel. The show follows a group of 30-somethings as they try to get their chaotic lives on track.

The Handy Circle

Another selected for the Pilot Category, Samuel Shelton’s web series The Handy Circle is a drama / comedy set in a world where puppets and humans live side by side. Due to the new Puppet distancing act, puppets and human relations are outlawed; puppets have to learn to operate themselves while humans must come to terms with not being able to operate their puppet companions that they love to the verge of obsession. The Handy Circle is a recovery program to help the heavily addicted.

Last updated on 23 September 2021

The 2021 Whānau Mārama: New Zealand International Film Festival has announced an impressive lineup of New Zealand feature films. More than a few DEGNZ members have had their films selected and we would like to congratulate each and every member. We can’t wait to see your mahi on the big screen!

This is the first part of our NZIFF 2021 members round-up.

Millie Lies Low

Premiering to the world this year, Michelle Savill’s feature film directorial debut, Millie Lies Low (pictured above), tells the story of an architecture grad accepted into a prestigious internship who panics, misses her flight and fakes being in New York while hiding out in her hometown.

Rohe Kōreporepo – The Swamp, the Sacred Place

Over the past 150 years, 90% of Aotearoa’s swaps have been drained – a tragedy considering they are among the world’s most valuable and bio-diverse ecosystems. Exploring the re-flooding, re-creation and restoration of our wetlands, Rohe Kōreporepo – The Swamp, the Sacred Place is a documentary most befitting the global crisis of our time and was edited by Gaylene Barnes.

There Is No I in Threesome

Following a critically acclaimed US premiere on HBO max, the documentary There Is No I in Threesome returns home for its theatrical world premiere on the big screen. Another milestone for DEGNZ members, director Jan Oliver Lucks and our board member Francis Glenday who cut the film.

 

A Mild Touch of Cancer

Annie Goldson directed, produced and wrote the screenplay for A Mild Touch of Cancer. David Downs survived cancer and is dedicated to helping fellow New Zealanders face their own cancer journeys. These are their stories. A Mild Touch of Cancer will have its theatrical premiere at the festival this year. With an impressive twenty year career and multiple awards under Annie’s belt, we’re sure this will be an unmissable documentary.

Fiona Clark: Unafraid

Director Lula Cucchiara’s Fiona Clark: Unafraid unravels the legacy of a great New Zealand photographer whose work ensures that the history of marginalised queer communities in Aotearoa is never forgotten. This intimate portrait of a ground-breaking photographer will have its world premiere at NZIFF. This doco is edited by Anastasia Doniants, who was selected for our first ever DEGNZ Drama Editor Attachment in 2018, and Shailesh Prajapati was assistant editor.

Mark Hunt: The Fight of His Life

Described as an autobiographical rags-to-riches story, Mark Hunt: The Fight of His Life, shines a light on one of New Zealand’s most prolific sporting superstars. Veteran filmmaker Peter Brook Bell directs and Gary Sims edits this compelling and harrowing documentary, charting Hunt’s challenging childhood to his global success as the New Zealand MMA fighter and UFC champion.

Mothers of the Revolution

DEGNZ board member Margot Francis is one of four editors of the feature-length documentary Mothers of the Revolution, telling the story of a nineteen year protest where thousands of women from around the world came together at Greenham Common to take a stand against nuclear proliferation. This is the story of one of the longest protests in history!

Whetū Mārama – Bright Star

Aileen O’Sullivan is one half of the directing partnership of the documentary Whetū Mārama – Bright Star, telling the inspiring story of Sir Hekenukumai Ngaiwi Puhipi, aka Hek Busby, modern pioneer waka builder and navigator.

Patu!

To mark the 40th anniversary of the 1981 Springbok tour protests, Patu! will take to the big screen once more with this restored and remastered version, newly preserved by Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision. The team worked for nearly five years to bring this landmark film back to the big screen. First released in 1983 and cut by Annie Collins, we can’t wait to see it in the cinema once again!

Last updated on 23 September 2021