Ko te manu e kai ana i te miro nōnā te ngahere, 
ko te manu e kai ana i te mātauranga nōnā te ao.

‘The forest belongs to the bird who feasts on the miro berry, 
the world belongs to the bird who feasts on education’.

 

Our kaupapa is to inspire rangatahi to look beyond the glamour of filmmaking to the hidden engine room that controls the story and magic of a film – Editorial.

If you’d like to know more, come along to a workshop where you can find out what’s involved, hear from and talk with Māori who have made a career in film editing. Have a go with a scene from an award winning Māori drama on the latest editing software and find out just how much influence and responsibility an editor has on a film.

Tikanga Māori will be in place, some tutors are te reo speakers, and te reo is welcomed in the workshop but not required.

Ngā Kaiwhakahaere: Hineani Melbourne (NAW) & Tui Ruwhiu (DEGNZ)

Ngā Kaiako:

TE RUREHE PAKI (Editor Merata: how Mum Decolonised the Screen, Vapnierka, Making Good Men, The Gravediggers of Kapu)

ANNIE COLLINS (Editor Coming Home in the Dark, premiere Sundance 2021)


Support Tutors: Lea McLean & Onehou Strickland

Workshop Details

When: Saturday 29 May 2021, 9:30am – 4:30pm with capacity for a chat, or a little extra time for finishing a task until 5:30pm if required.

Where: South Seas Film School Campus – Yoobee Colleges, Unit 6/75 Ellice Road, Wairau Valley, Auckland 0629
If you need help with transport to the North Shore, please let us know when you register.

For Ages: 17 – 30 year old

Price: Free of charge. Includes lunch & refreshments.

 

Registration Form

Registrations Close: Monday 24 May, 4PM

Spaces limited to 14. We will email you to confirm your place.

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This workshop is instigated and run by Ngā Aho Whakaari (Maori in Screen) and the Directors & Editors Guild of New Zealand (Ngā Kaiwherawhera Kiriata)

       


Supported by the
New Zealand Film Commission

NZFC

 

Congratulations to our members who recently won awards at Doc Edge Pitch 2021. Member Paul Wolffram and ShuRun Yap won the award for Best Pitch – New Zealand with Sanguma. Dhaka DocLab Prizes went to both Rajneel Singh with Operation Rambu! and Kim Webby with Ratman and the Whales.

The Best Pitch prizes include a range of services that will assist Paul Wolffram and ShuRun Yap with their project, including post-production services from Park Road Post and travel assistance from the NZ Film Commission to attend the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (IDFA).

Sweet Tooth will premiere June 4 on Netflix. Based on the comic book of the same name by Jeff Lemire, the series follows a lovable half-human and half-deer boy as he embarks on a dangerous adventure across a post-apocalyptic world. Production for Sweet Tooth was granted permission to film in NZ despite the travel restrictions brought on by covid, a production that involved many Kiwis.

DEGNZ member Robyn Grace was one of them, directing on an episode and working as the first assistant director on others. Fellow DEGNZ member Toa Fraser, who recently revealed his battle with early onset Parkinson’s on Twitter, served as Producing Director for the season. Toa spoke with Saturday Morning on RNZ about life with Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease. Kia kaha Toa.

 

 

Edited by DEGNZ member Jonno Woodford-Robinson, Poppy, inspired by real life hero Poppy Anderson, tells the story of a young woman with Down Syndrome who refuses to let that define her and decides to take control of her own life. Libby Hunsdale told Sunday TVNZ that “We shouldn’t think of Down Syndrome as an illness or condition, it can be a success tool”.

The film was the first local film to resume production after a long hiatus caused by coronavirus in 2020. Poppy was written and directed by Linda Niccol and will open in NZ cinemas on May 27.

Head to their Facebook page to follow the film.

 

 

Where is the real progress in feminism? That’s the main question being asked in Louise Lever’s (DEGNZ) latest film Revolt, She Said. Featuring candid interviews with Former Prime Minister of NZ Helen Clark and other inspiring Kiwi and Australian women, the documentary discusses why women are considered the secondary gender.

Nominated for Best Documentary at the New York Independent Film Festival, Revolt, She Said will be showing in Auckland on May 7 at the Raye Freedman Arts Centre, followed by a Q&A with Louise herself.

Purchase your tickets here.