Tom Eagles Earns Oscar and BAFTA Nominations for Film Editing

Tom Eagles

The Directors & Editors Guild of NZ congratulates New Zealand editor Tom Eagles for his Oscar and BAFTA nominations for best editing on Jojo Rabbit.

Eagles is nominated in the same Oscar category as The Irishman, Joker, Parasite and Ford v Ferrari. Other films nominated for the BAFTA are Once Upon a Time… In Hollywood, Le Mans ’66 (Ford v Ferrari), Joker and The Irishman. 

An alumnus of DEGNZ’s International Editor Mentorships, Eagles was mentored by award-winning Australian editor Dany Cooper in 2016 after completing Hunt for the Wilderpeople. The mentorship offered genuine insight into creative process and engagement with the industry as a whole, while providing a solid platform upon which the recipient could build an international career.

Jojo Rabbit is nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture, and six BAFTAs.

DEGNZ Drama Editor Attachment Call for Applications

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The DEGNZ Drama Editor Attachment Scheme is a new initiative giving emerging drama editors the opportunity to advance their craft through shadowing and mentoring from an experienced drama editor.

Emerging drama editors are invited to apply for our third DEGNZ Drama Editor Attachment. The successful candidate will attach to editor Peter Roberts on feature film Juniper, directed by Matthew Saville, and produced by Desray Armstrong and Angela Littlejohn.

Since relocating from the United Kingdom, Peter Roberts has made his mark in New Zealand as an editor. Roberts found his editing niche at TVNZ, before a prolific freelance career saw him cutting a string of documentaries, shorts, and features — including award-winning drama The Dark Horse. In 2013 he became the first editor to be elected President of the Directors and Editors Guild of New Zealand. Peter’s other credits include Sam kelly’s feature Savage, due for release in NZ in 2020 following its world premiere in 2019 at the Busan International Film Festival; hit NZ – Aus. TV drama series Cleverman; telefeature Jean, helmed by Rob Sarkies; and Bryn Evans directed feature doc. Hip Hop-eration.

The DEGNZ Drama Editor Attachment initiative is targeted at editors who wish to move into feature film editing. Its purpose is to allow an emerging drama editor to:

  • learn through attendance during editing, and later at director, producer and or funding body screenings about the critique and response process so vital to the successful creative collaboration required of the feature film editor.
  • get on-the-job feature-editing experience.
  • receive feedback and mentoring from an experienced feature film editor in a safe environment.

The opportunity for the attachment to get limited hands-on cutting experience is possible but entirely at the discretion of the editor, director and producers of the production.

This is a paid Auckland-based attachment and requires the successful candidate depending on experience and flexibility to start at the earliest in February 2020. If non-Auckland based, the candidate must cover their own travel and living costs. They are also required to be a Full member of DEGNZ for the duration of their attachment.

The duration of the attachment would be up to a maximum of 30 full days, but may well be broken down into a mixture of full days and half days. The first week is expected to be full time.

Eligibility

To be eligible, applicants MUST:

  1. Be a FULL member of DEGNZ
  2. Be fully competent with the AVID editing system
  3. Have some past dramatic narrative editing experience (does not have to be extensive)
  4. Be available to participate fully during the post production period, starting in February
  5. Most importantly, have a passionate desire to become a feature film editor

To Apply

Application Deadline: 5PM, Friday 17 January 2020

Send your application in a single PDF to admin@degnz.co.nz with ‘Editor Attachment’ in the subject line.

Your application must include:

  • a maximum 1-page letter on why you would like to do the attachment
  • your CV and filmography, including links to a showreel/video samples that illustrate your dramatic narrative work
  • a completed Editor Attachment Application Cover Sheet.

Download the Editor Attachment Application Cover Sheet

DEGNZ will notify you as to whether or not your application has been successful, but the decision will be final and no further correspondence will be entered into regarding your application.

We look forward to receiving your applications.

This attachment is brought to you with the generous support of the New Zealand Film Commission.

 

An Active November at DEGNZ

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November was a particularly busy month in events for DEGNZ. We ran a 2-day weekend Directors Toolkit in Wellington with director Charlie Haskell, which was greatly enjoyed by the directors in attendance.

The following week, DEGNZ vice-president Louise Leitch taught best practices for directing scenes involving intimacy and nudity in Christchurch on Saturday 23 November. Directors and actors left feeling equipped with valuable skills that they could put into practice right away. That same day in Auckland, members of DEGNZ and WIFT gathered for a Screenlinkmorning tea at Department of Post. Dan Best shared on what it’s like to work as the First Assistant Editor and VFX Editor for a film the size of Mortal Engines.

It was fantastic to see new and familiar faces at our Young Creators night Serious about Series. Flat3 Productions’ Ally Xue and JJ Fong gave an inspiring and useful session on working in the world of web series.

NZWG hosted the last round of the guild Table Reads in 2019. Writer/director and DEGNZ member Linda Niccol travelled up to Auckland with her producers to have their feature film script read. The team came away with lots of excellent feedback from the actors involved.

Our last workshop on November 30 was Rehearsal & Performance with actor/director Ian Hughes in Auckland. Ian led an engaging session with directors and actors dedicated to learning skills around director-actor communication, especially on fast shoots.

To top everything off, we celebrated the year with our members and other screen bodies at the three Screen Guilds Christmas Parties in November and December. Thanks to everyone who came!

You can find photos of our events on Instagram.

Meri Kirihimete and Happy New Year!

Our office will be closed after Friday 20 December and reopens on Monday 13 January 2020.

Meri Kirihimete me te Hape Nū Ia to you and your loved ones from the team here at DEGNZ. We hope you also have a wonderful break over the summer. See you again in 2020!

Skills, Training, Learning

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At DEGNZ we undertake a considerable amount of professional development to advance the craft of directing and editing. We are not the only screen industry guild or association to do so.

Right now however, there is a confluence of activity occurring in the education sector that will have a significant impact on the screen industry, hopefully for the better.

In August, the Government announced the Reform of Vocational Education. This comes in part, I believe, because of the decline in the apprenticeship system that was brought about by a radical restructuring and liberalisation of the economy and education sector by the fourth Labour Government in the 1980s.

The inability of Polytechnics to financially survive is another reason. Case in point is Unitec in Auckland’s Mt Albert, the country’s largest institute of Technology. Unitec has been in financial difficulty for years, and this has long been known in the screen industry. Whitirea and WelTec are two others in the same boat.

It’s clear though that the workplace is changing. Lower skilled jobs are disappearing because of automation and other factors, while new jobs are coming to the fore. These new jobs need increased training to upskill the workforce for the new roles being created.

What’s all this got to do with us?

Well, as we know the Creative Sector is a funny old beast. Most of us are contractors and there are few large companies. But, we will continue to undergo rapid change due to technology, and more importantly, there is a crew shortage due to the significant level of production activity happening here. Consequently, there is a need to encourage more workers into the industry and to train them to meet the demand.

The Government is looking to the Reform of Vocational Education to bring about seven key changes that they hope will create a unified vocational education system:

  1. Create Workforce Development Councils (WDC) to give industry greater leadership across vocational education.
  2. Establish Regional Skills Leadership Groups to provide advice about the skills needs of their regions.
  3. Establish Te Taumata Aronui to help ensure that the Reform of Vocational Education reflects the Government’s commitment to Māori Crown partnerships.
  4. Create a New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology, bringing together the existing 16 Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs), such as Unitec, Whitirea and WelTec.
  5. Shift the role of supporting workplace learning from Industry Training Organisations (ITOs) to providers.
  6. Establish Centres of Vocational Excellence to grow excellent vocational education provision and share high-quality curriculum and programme design across the system.
  7. Unify the vocational education funding system.

The Tertiary Education Commission is now proposing to establish a industry specific training organisation for the Creative Sector, something the industry hasn’t had before. This WDC would be the voice of industry, participating in a virtuous circle with employers, educational providers and educational bodies to help ensure a focused and effective approach to vocational training.

At the same time, The Screen Industry Guild of Aotearoa NZ (Techos) is seeking to implement tactical initiatives to get more skilled workers on the ground fast. They are working together in the Auckland region with Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED), who are making a concerted effort to build capability in this area, too. There is a national focus on vocational training for all sectors including the Creative Sector, to ensure the regions benefit as well. The Film Commission, the guilds and numerous other bodies and organisations are looking at supporting this push to shape education for our sector.

It is interesting to observe that the concept of apprenticeships in the Creative Sector is a topic of conversation that has risen to the surface as all of this goes on. At DEGNZ, we have made a real effort this year in the area of assistant editors and we have often discussed an apprenticeship-style model. Our director attachments for TV drama, while definitively not apprenticeships, do deliver the on the job-training that epitomises apprenticeship schemes.

For many in the screen industry, the key to success can often be just getting out there and practising the craft. There’s no doubt though that the formal approach of vocational training will better equip many to find their way into the industry and help ensure sunstainable careers in an ever-changing workplace environment.

 

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director