Posts

DEGNZ member Hannah Marshall’s Frankie Jean & The Morning Star screened at Flickerfest International Short Film Festival in Sydney, Australia’s largest local and international short film competition. The film is currently screening to regional audiences around Australia as part of the Flickerfest Best of International Shorts National Tour.

Frankie Jean & The Morning Star was written and directed by Hannah Marshall and edited by member Luke Haigh. After the All Blacks lose the Rugby Championship, a devastated, rugby-obsessed 8 year old girl sneaks out to practice and stumbles across a teenager about to end his life.

Member Gillian Ashurst’s Snakeskin, originally released in 2001, opened the Made in Canterbury Festival at Isaac Theatre Royal (March 19-21).

Shot on 35mm and edited by DEGNZ member Cushla Dillon, it was the first public screening of the newly digitised film, funded by the NZFC’s Film Digitisation Programme. Gillian was present to introduce the film.

Filmed against the backdrop of the Canterbury landscape, Alice (Melanie Lynskey) and Johnny (Dean O’ Gorman) are a couple of suburban kids, cruising the highways searching for adventure, old enough to know what they’re doing – young enough to get it wrong. Their paths cross with an American cowboy in snakeskin boots, Seth (Boyd Kestner), looking for a ride. Seth takes the kiwis on the trip of their dreams, but they soon discover this snake can create nightmares, and in the heart of the Southern Alps, these kids are about to pay.

Snakeskin won five awards at the 2001 NZ Film and TV Awards, including best film.

Local film This Town will shortly have its US Premiere at Seattle International Film Festival (April 8-18), while short film Daddy’s Girl (Kōtiro) has also been officially selected for SIFF 2021. Congrats to board member Francis Glenday, editor on This Town, and to Daddy’s Girl director Cian Elyse White (DEGNZ) and editor, DEGNZ board member Annie Collins. Daddy’s Girl will screen within SIFF’s short film programme Leveling Up.

Making the Intangible Tangible

What is tone? How does a director establish it and best communicate it? Establishing the tone of your film is a key element of filmmaking, a vital part of the process of making the intangible tangible.  

The director’s vision for a film and his or her voice are key elements of tone. As are frame rate, music and sound effects, lighting, colour, production design, wardrobe and makeup, framing and movement. Tone is all encompassing.  

In the first two of three new workshops on tone, run by the Directors & Editors Guild of NZ, participants will explore with director Rob Sarkies how a director goes about setting the tone of a film.

The third workshop with another esteemed director will be announced at a later date.

Tone with Rob Sarkies

Rob Sarkies

Credit: Matt Grace Photography

Tone is suggested by the script and clues will be found in the story, setting, action and characters. But it is also determined by the director’s tastes, culture, and instincts. Rob’s workshop explores how to translate all this into a coherent visual form and communicate it to others.

Rob’s work ranges (quite literally) from comedy to tragedy so he knows the importance of establishing a unique tone for each production, be it film or television. Using examples from his work, Rob will guide participants through a process where they can explore tone for an upcoming work. It will help to have your own project in mind – a short film, a first feature, a web series etc – when you come to the workshop.

 

Wellington – Sunday 18 April 2021, 9:30am – 4pm
Applications close Tuesday 13 April, 3PM. More info >

Auckland – Sunday 16 May 2021, 9:30am – 4pm
Applications close Tuesday 11 May, 3PM. More info >

 

Travel Allowances

DEGNZ Full members based outside of Wellington and Auckland can apply to the Guild for travel support up to the value of $250 (incl GST). We have six grants available.

To apply you must meet these criteria:

  1. You live outside of both the Wellington and Auckland regions.
  2. You are a NZ Citizen or permanent resident.
  3. You have a confirmed place in one of the Tone workshops.

For additional information and criteria, see here.

 


This initiative is brought to you with the generous support of the New Zealand Film Commission.

NZFC

American on demand service Hulu has picked up the US rights to Kiwi drama Rūrangi, directed by Max Currie (DEGNZ). Currie expressed his joy saying, “Holy cow, we are streaming on Hulu! This is proof the sky’s the limit for New Zealand’s burgeoning trans talent.” The platform will release Rūrangi in June of this year for its American audiences.

UK company Peccadillo Pictures previously acquired the UK rights to the series and plans to release it later this year. For New Zealand audiences, Rūrangi will be available on NEON in May.

Season two of the series is currently in development and the film adaption is on theatrical release in Aotearoa. Rūrangi was closing night film for Sydney’s Mardi Gras Film Festival (Feb 18-March 4) and is currently screening at BFI Flare: London LGBTIQ+ Film Festival in the ‘Hearts’ programme (March 17-28).

Read more