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As part of the Wairoa Māori Film Festival, DEGNZ Incubator alumna Hiona Henare spoke with Tia Taurere-Clearsky (DEGNZ) about her work as a prized Māori film editor, camera operator and international field journalist.

Now living in the Coast Salish Territory in British Columbia, Canada, Tia spoke about the lack of Indigenous editors in the film industry, both male and female, and how she is involved in two programmes as a mentor to hopefully change this by encouraging up and coming Indigenous editors.

Even though she is far away from home, Tia shared how thankful she is to live in a community filled with Indigenous people and how beneficial it is for both herself and her children, that even though being away from Aotearoa can be lonely, being a part of an Indigenous community makes it easier.

Watch the kōrero here:

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2928171774064782

 

 

This past Queen’s Birthday weekend saw the annual Wairoa Māori Film Festival take place, a festival that celebrates Māori cinema, with multiple films by DEGNZ members showcased.

Chantelle Burgoyne with Ocean and Jaimee Poipoi with Guess You were a part of the Mana Wahine Shorts programme.

Karma by Sam Li and Flip by DEGNZ Incubator alumna Jessica Grace Smith screened as part of the festival’s Midnight Madness programme. Flip was edited by Guild member Alex Boyd.

Meanwhile, Hannah Marshall’s Frankie Jean & The Morning Star, edited by Luke Haigh, played in the Aotearoa Shorts programme.

Matariki on the Move

Keep an eye out for Cian Elyse White’s Daddy’s Girl (Kōtiro), edited by Annie Collins, which will screen in local Auckland cinemas as part of the festival’s Matariki on the Move programme (June 24 – July 6). It will play alongside other short and feature-length films, including Merata Mita’s Mauri.

Kia Ora Shorts

Wairoa Māori Film Festival has also curated a list of the best Māori short films in their Kia Ora Shorts programme, screening in Auckland on July 8 – 9. Ngariki Ngatae’s Te Wao Nui, edited by Tia Taurere-Clearsky (DEGNZ), will feature alongside Frankie Jean & The Morning Star and Daddy’s Girl (Kotiro).

If you’re in Tāmaki Makaurau, check out the full programmes and where to watch them here.

Ko te manu e kai ana i te miro nōnā te ngahere, 
ko te manu e kai ana i te mātauranga nōnā te ao.

‘The forest belongs to the bird who feasts on the miro berry, 
the world belongs to the bird who feasts on education’.

 

Our kaupapa is to inspire rangatahi to look beyond the glamour of filmmaking to the hidden engine room that controls the story and magic of a film – Editorial.

If you’d like to know more, come along to a workshop where you can find out what’s involved, hear from and talk with Māori who have made a career in film editing. Have a go with a scene from an award winning Māori drama on the latest editing software and find out just how much influence and responsibility an editor has on a film.

Tikanga Māori will be in place, some tutors are te reo speakers, and te reo is welcomed in the workshop but not required.

Ngā Kaiwhakahaere: Hineani Melbourne (NAW) & Tui Ruwhiu (DEGNZ)

Ngā Kaiako:

TE RUREHE PAKI (Editor Merata: how Mum Decolonised the Screen, Vapnierka, Making Good Men, The Gravediggers of Kapu)

ANNIE COLLINS (Editor Coming Home in the Dark, premiere Sundance 2021)


Support Tutors: Lea McLean & Onehou Strickland

Workshop Details

When: Saturday 29 May 2021, 9:30am – 4:30pm with capacity for a chat, or a little extra time for finishing a task until 5:30pm if required.

Where: South Seas Film School Campus – Yoobee Colleges, Unit 6/75 Ellice Road, Wairau Valley, Auckland 0629
If you need help with transport to the North Shore, please let us know when you register.

For Ages: 17 – 30 years old

Price: Free of charge. Includes lunch & refreshments.

 

Registration Form

Registrations Close: Monday 24 May, 4PM

Spaces limited to 14. We will email you to confirm your place.

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This workshop is instigated and run by Ngā Aho Whakaari (Maori in Screen) and the Directors & Editors Guild of New Zealand (Ngā Kaiwherawhera Kiriata)

       


Supported by the
New Zealand Film Commission

NZFC

 

Ko te manu e kai ana i te miro nōnā te ngahere, 
ko te manu e kai ana i te mātauranga nōnā te ao.

‘The forest belongs to the bird who feasts on the miro berry, 
the world belongs to the bird who feasts on education’.

Two-Day Workshop for Maori Editors 17 & 18 April

This workshop is for emerging to mid-level Maori editors with a focus on preparing you to transition to independent drama productions.

Tikanga Maori will be in place, some tutors are te reo speakers, and te reo is welcomed in the workshop.

We will cover:

  • setting up an Editorial department
  • interaction with the pre-production and production crew
  • scheduling an edit
  • setting up the workflow systems from camera originals through to handovers to independent post houses (sound design, picture conform, composer, VFX, titles graphic artist)
  • relationships with other departments including producers and directors
  • handling screenings, and giving and receiving feedback.

The focus is on managing an independent Editorial department for an independent production, not on how to edit – it is assumed that you know how to edit and you have your own style and vision that you should retain. The workshop will use Avid Ultimate 2020.8, and you are urged to familiarise yourself via online tutorials.

The workshop commences at 9:30am each day, finishing around 4:30pm with capacity for a chat, or a little extra time for finishing a task until 5:30pm if required. Lunch is provided, tea and coffee for morning and afternoon breaks.

Limited Spaces. We will email you to confirm whether you’ve been accepted.

Workshop Details

Ngā Kaiwhakahaere: Hineani Melbourne (NAW) & Tui Ruwhiu (DEGNZ)

Ngā Kaiako:

Te Rurehe Paki (editor Merata: how Mum Decolonised the Screen, Vapnierka, Making Good Men, The Gravediggers of Kapu)

Annie Collins (editor Coming Home in the Dark, premiere Sundance 2021)

Location: South Seas Film School Campus – Yoobee Colleges, Unit 6/75 Ellice Road, Wairau Valley, Auckland 0629

Price: Workshop offered free of charge because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Travel Allowances: If selected to attend, DEGNZ and NAW members may apply for financial assistance of up to $150 (incl. GST) towards their travel costs. To be eligible:

  • Applicants must live in New Zealand outside the Auckland region.
  • Applicants must be a current member of DEGNZ or NAW.
  • There are up to 8 travel allowances available for this workshop.

 

Application Form

Applications Deadline: Friday 9 April, 2PM

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Brought to you by Ngā Aho Whakaari and the Directors & Editors Guild of NZ

       


with the generous support of the
New Zealand Film Commission.

NZFC

 

View from the Top banner

The New Zealand Film Commission (NZFC) took an official delegation to China and Taiwan in June of this year, and I was fortunate to be invited along to Taipei for the Taiwan leg as the ED of DEGNZ.

There was a strong indigenous focus to the visit with the New Zealand Commercial Investment Office (our government’s official representation there) and the NZFC organising a Matariki Festival with a number of events for the Taiwanese Film Industry, and public screenings of some New Zealand films.

On show were Hunt for the Wilderpeople, Born to Dance, and My Wedding and Other Secrets, with director Tammy Davis and DEGNZ board member and director Roseanne Liang along to introduce and do Q & A’s for their films. Also attending were writer and director Michael Bennett, representing Ngā Aho Whakaari, and playwright and screenwriter Briar Grace-Smith.

Taiwan has 11 officially recognised indigenous tribes and there is a very strong link between the Taiwanese indigenous peoples and Māori, with everyone acknowledging whakapapa through our DNA connections. This connection has received official acknowledgement with the New Zealand Commerce and Industry Office in Taipei and the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in New Zealand signing a document entitled “Arrangement on Cooperation on Indigenous Issues”. This will establish cultural and “people-to-people” connections between Taiwan’s indigenous peoples and New Zealand Māori in order to promote mutual understanding and friendly relations.

This was my second visit to Taiwan, following my time there in October of last year to attend the Asian Producers Network conference. I was once again struck by the friendliness of the people, particularly the strong and positive response by the indigenous locals to anything and anyone Māori. There was even a Māori cultural group made up of ex-pats out of Hong Kong to give the various events some distinctive Aotearoa New Zealand flavour.

As part of the effort to develop bonds between Taiwan and New Zealand, the NZFC and the Taipei Film Commission announced a Professional Sreenwriters Exchange. Under the exchange one professional screenwriter from Taiwan will travel to New Zealand and one professional screenwriter from New Zealand will travel to Taiwan for at least a month, in order to strengthen cultural ties and promote greater cooperation between the film industries on both sides.

The exchange is intended to occur on an annual basis and is aimed at applicants who have experience writing a minimum of one feature film script that has been produced as a feature-length film. They also need to have either direct personal experience or a strong interest in Māori culture and/or the Indigenous Peoples of Taiwan.

I lived in Japan for a long time and have visited China a couple of times and many Southeast Asian countries repeatedly. Of them all, I feel that Taiwan is at the moment perhaps the most proactively open to doing coproductions with New Zealand. While the budgets there aren’t big with US$1 million being the average film budget and an almost purely commercial focus on box office, Taiwan I think offers great opportunity for filmmakers who want to work with Asian partners … with the right story.

On our delegation were some producers who are already engaged with Taiwan on projects, looking to leverage off a Taiwan-NZ connection, or working with Taiwan to access Mainland China.

Official activity aside, Taipei has great architecture, galleries and museums, outdoor activities and fabulous food. And wouldn’t you know it, after delegates found various ways to wing their way there via stopovers in Singapore, Hong Kong or Brisbane, Air New Zealand opened up direct flights to Taiwan after our visit.

I guess you can’t have it all.

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director