Posts

Ko te manu e kai ana i te miro nōnā te ngahere, 
ko te manu e kai ana i te mātauranga nōnā te ao.

‘The forest belongs to the bird who feasts on the miro berry, 
the world belongs to the bird who feasts on education’.

Two-Day Workshop for Maori Editors 17 & 18 April

This workshop is for emerging to mid-level Maori editors with a focus on preparing you to transition to independent drama productions.

Tikanga Maori will be in place, some tutors are te reo speakers, and te reo is welcomed in the workshop.

We will cover:

  • setting up an Editorial department
  • interaction with the pre-production and production crew
  • scheduling an edit
  • setting up the workflow systems from camera originals through to handovers to independent post houses (sound design, picture conform, composer, VFX, titles graphic artist)
  • relationships with other departments including producers and directors
  • handling screenings, and giving and receiving feedback.

The focus is on managing an independent Editorial department for an independent production, not on how to edit – it is assumed that you know how to edit and you have your own style and vision that you should retain. The workshop will use Avid Ultimate 2020.8, and you are urged to familiarise yourself via online tutorials.

The workshop commences at 9:30am each day, finishing around 4:30pm with capacity for a chat, or a little extra time for finishing a task until 5:30pm if required. Lunch is provided, tea and coffee for morning and afternoon breaks.

Limited Spaces. We will email you to confirm whether you’ve been accepted.

Workshop Details

Ngā Kaiwhakahaere: Hineani Melbourne (NAW) & Tui Ruwhiu (DEGNZ)

Ngā Kaiako:

Te Rurehe Paki (editor Merata: how Mum Decolonised the Screen, Vapnierka, Making Good Men, The Gravediggers of Kapu)

Annie Collins (editor Coming Home in the Dark, premiere Sundance 2021)

Location: South Seas Film School Campus – Yoobee Colleges, Unit 6/75 Ellice Road, Wairau Valley, Auckland 0629

Price: Workshop offered free of charge because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Travel Allowances: If selected to attend, DEGNZ and NAW members may apply for financial assistance of up to $150 (incl. GST) towards their travel costs. To be eligible:

  • Applicants must live in New Zealand outside the Auckland region.
  • Applicants must be a current member of DEGNZ or NAW.
  • There are up to 8 travel allowances available for this workshop.

 

Application Form

Applications Deadline: Friday 9 April, 2PM

Loading…


Brought to you by Ngā Aho Whakaari and the Directors & Editors Guild of NZ

       


with the generous support of the
New Zealand Film Commission.

NZFC

 

For the first time in its five-year history and as part of its Diversity focus, the DEGNZ Emerging Women Filmmakers Incubator for 2021 will focus solely on a Diversity call for applications.

The Directors & Editors Guild of NZ welcomes applications from Māori, Pacific Island, Pan-Asian and other POC female directors to take part in this talent development programme.

Background

The overall vision of the DEGNZ Women Filmmakers Incubator is to empower the participating directors with the confidence, knowledge and connections that they can use to go on and direct a feature film, drama or scripted series.

The Incubator is intended primarily for emerging debut directors of feature film (drama or documentary), but will also consider those wishing to establish careers in TV drama and scripted content.

Applicants must apply with a project, but the Incubator is primarily focused on filmmaker development, not project development.

The objectives of the Incubator are:

  • Increase the number of women directing features and TV drama.
  • Connect producers, broadcasters and funders with female directors with a view to getting more female-centric stories into and through development.
  • Create networking opportunities for women directors to further their projects and careers.
  • Inspire and encourage women directors to passionately pursue feature film and drama directing careers through interaction with successful women who serve as role models.
  • Improve directors’ understanding of the business of film and television drama.
Workshops

Participants will attend five one-day workshops across 2021 with the first scheduled to take place in late April. All workshops are intended to be held in Auckland, and a travel allowance will be available for participants based in other regions.

Participants need access to a computer (recommended) or another device to participate online via Zoom, if the workshops are affected by COVID-19 Alert Levels.

The workshops are individually themed to provide specific knowledge, networks, skills, and inspiration that enable participants to advance themselves and their careers. As the global screen industry undergoes constant change at this time, DEGNZ will remain flexible as to the actual content of the programme, seeking to incorporate information and opportunities that are relevant.

 


Eligibility

All applicants will be expected to have a good level of directing experience with scripted content, such as acclaimed web series, shorts with festival success, TV commercials, or broadcast content.

Applicants must:
  1. Have an active project (feature film, documentary feature, telefeature, TV/online drama or scripted series) in development that has never been presented to a broadcaster or funder. It is preferable that the project is at least at first draft script but if not available, there must be a detailed Writer’s Treatment for the project. A Director’s Treatment that includes Style, Tone, Imagery, Look & Feel, etc. is NOT requested. The applicant does not have to be the writer on the project.
  2. Have experience as a director of scripted content (drama, comedy) or documentary in the form of the project they are submitting, i.e. if you are applying with a narrative drama project, you must have experience directing narrative drama or if it’s comedy, experience directing comedy, etc.
  3. Have a directing credit on one of the following:
    • a short film selected for one of the NZFC’s Recommended Short Film Festivals, the New Zealand International Film Festival, Show Me Shorts Film Festival or any regional film festival in New Zealand. You need to supply in your filmography and links section the Festival Name, Year of Selection, and a link to the full film or content selected, for viewing purposes.
    • a commissioned scripted one-off or series by a broadcaster or digital platform. You need to supply in your filmography and links section the Broadcaster or Platform Name, Year of First Broadcast/Play, and a link to content commissioned, for viewing purposes.
  4. For feature film, be a debut director.
  5. Be available to participate in all workshops.
  6. Identify as female and be of Māori, Pacific Island, Pan-Asian or other POC heritage.
  7. Be a NZ Citizen or permanent resident.
Membership

Selected participants must be DEGNZ Full members for the duration of the Incubator programme.

 


How to Apply

Application Deadline: 9AM, Monday 12 April 2021

Application Requirements:

  1. A completed DEGNZ Women Filmmakers Incubator Application Cover Sheet (PDF 291KB).
  2. A one-page synopsis of the project with the ending revealed.
  3. A maximum two-page letter stating what your career goals are and why you want to participate in this Incubator.
  4. A one-page bio (not a CV).
  5. A filmography and links to completed work that supports the project you are including with this application. Include details as per eligibility requirement 3.

Compile your documents into one single PDF in the order matching requirements 1 – 5.

Give the single PDF the following naming convention: (YourName)_DEGNZWomenFilmmakersIncubator_2021

Send your application to admin@degnz.co.nz with DEGNZWFI2021 in the subject line.

Selection Process

A selection panel will shortlist candidates. Shortlisted candidates must be available for a one-on-one interview via Zoom to be held in the week of April 12. Getting an interview does not imply that you have been selected for the Incubator.

If shortlisted, you will be expected to immediately supply prior to the interview a detailed Writer’s Treatment of your active project (different to your 1-page synopsis). The treatment needs to be within a minimum of 5 pages to a maximum of 10 pages.

The Incubator participants will be selected from the shortlist following the interview.

Decisions will be final and no correspondence will be entered into.

 

The Incubator is made possible thanks to the generous support of the New Zealand Film Commission.

NZFC


Questions about the Incubator?

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director
tui@degnz.co.nz
+64 9 360 2102

 

View from the Top banner

Like most everyone else, I’ve been walking around with a smile on my face since Winston Peters decided which side of the seesaw to get on.

I’m not as rabidly dogmatic as many left of centre seem to be in the screen industry, but I do know that the social fabric of New Zealand society has been torn under National, the Arts have suffered, and it deeply disturbs me that we can’t swim in many of our waterways anymore.

I’ve read numerous articles online about what the change of government means for education, transport, trade, the economy, the environment and other sectors, but I haven’t seen anything yet on what it means for the Arts, and more particularly for the screen industry. So like everybody else, I’m going to postulate about some things.

Firstly, the minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage will be Grant Robertson, moving it far up the ladder from where it sat with Maggie Barry. Jacinda is passionate about the Arts and has been Labour’s Arts spokesperson, but won’t have the time this term to deal with it. I believe she’ll give the portfolio to Robertson, another strong Arts supporter, who himself will be busy with Finance. I’ll happily eat my words if Jacinda keeps it, though.

Second: the Hobbit Law. It’s goneburger. Labour outlined in its Fair Pay Agreements (FPAs) the ability for employers or employees/unions to be able to begin negotiations on FPAs once a sufficient percentage within an industry call for one. Under The Hobbit Law, all workers in the screen industry are classified as contractors, cannot collectively bargain and are not subject to the minimum working wage requirement—all the antithesis of what Labour stands for. The Hobbit Law will go and it’s up to the guilds to make sure that happens and that we unify to seek sustainable careers in the screen industry.

Next, copyright for directors. The Copyright Act Review is underway. I put considerable effort into lobbying Jacinda directly about director copyright when she was the Opposition spokesperson for Arts, Culture and Heritage. Director copyright is about sustainable careers, a touchpoint for Labour. Our chances on changing the copyright law are now slightly improved but will still need significant effort on our part. It’s not a big ticket item for government, but hopefully with Robertson we’ll have a more sympathetic ear and will be able to get to the other ministers who will count.

The other aspect of copyright is Google’s desire to see relaxed US Fair Use and Safe Harbours legislation enacted here, replacing our Fair Dealing regime that is more stringent and protects the intellectual property of creators better. They must have choked when Winston Peters said he was going with the Labour Party. Years of upfront and behind-the-scenes lobbying to swing National to their view just hit a major speed bump. But they had moved many beaureaucrats toward their line of thinking as well so we’re not off the hook yet. We still need to fight hard to keep Fair Dealing in the face of Google’s enormous financial muscle.

Then there’s public service TV. Radio New Zealand will be transformed into Radio NZ + as promised, giving us a digital platform that will deliver more quality reporting and investigative journalism, Maori, Pasifika and other diverse community content, as well as education and entertainment for children. How the additional $38 million will be spread between the proposed independent Public Media Funding Commissioner and NZ On Air funding is unclear, but it would seem that anything that falls under the remit of the new commissioner that currently is being funded by NZ On Air will move to the new fund, thereby not increasing NZ On Air’s funding but giving it more money to play with in the commercially contestable realm, which will continue to be its responsibility.

Labour understands that the Arts can also generate revenue, and that the screen industry is a significant employer as well as a hotbed for commercial innovation, particularly at the higher end. Steven Joyce never liked the screen incentives although he was smart enough to know we needed them. They will stay, and everyone will await the outcome of the full Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment assessment of the screen incentives currently underway. We might see more production funding for the NZFC for NZ films, which didn’t increase under National although they did top up the Screen Production Grant for both NZ and international films. This funding increase would come out of the Ministry of Economic Development portolio, who is supported by MBIE, who essentially controls the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, at least for the moment. David Parker will be the new Minister for Economic Development.

What about a Minister of Broadcasting? I’m sure Amy Adams helped do away with this as the last minister because she viewed broadcasting as a sunset industry. Labour won’t reintroduce one because Broadcasting, which essentially means Free-to-air these days, no longer holds the sway it once did.

We have to give thought to our public broadcaster TVNZ. This is a vexing question. It’s not the public broadcaster it’s meant to be. Labour would probably flog it off if there were a buyer for it, but who would want it? Perhaps a US network like CBS who has just won its battle to acquire Australia’s Network 10 for US$167 million? Or Fox, who lost out to CBS? Or a private equity fund like Ironbridge who stepped in to save Mediaworks? I don’t think there will be a knight in shining armour for TVNZ, though, with Mediaworks sitting there as an abject lesson, essentially held up by its radio business.

I’m guessing that Labour will leave TVNZ to its own commercial devices after stripping it of its public service mandate, and using whatever dividend it generates to help fund public broadcasting. A more interesting question is what will happen to the public broadcasting and current affairs shows funded by NZ On Air currently on the commercial channels, including the Māori programming? I think they’ll be looking for a new partner to + with.

Will Māori get more money to play with in the screen sector? Yes, because of the work that’s been done by NZFC around their Māori strategy, but that was coming anyway. No for Te Māngai Pāho who already received a boost last year, although not for content. I’d personally prefer that Labour made te reo mandatory in schools through their education policy rather than funding TMP to revitalise the language via Māori Television, although Whakaata Māori would need to keep producing Māori language content until we all caught up.

I don’t believe NZFC and NZ On Air will be merged. We have a new NZFC CEO who will be on a three-year contract. And with other changes to come and those that have recently occurred in and around the funding bodies, it doesn’t make sense to pursue such an idea now.

Creative New Zealand is going to get some attention. Grant Robertson as Associate Spokesperson for Arts Culture & Heritage in a Radio NZ interview prior to the election outlined thoughts that will require some restructuring at CNZ to achieve Labour’s ideas around regional Arts development, more practioners at the top table, and how to ensure young and emerging artists get a fair crack at the funding pie.

In the same interview Robertson gave Labour’s perspective on the Arts:

“Arts are the window to the soul of our people and our country.”

Labour is supportive of the Arts. It wants to see more funding go to the Arts. But it will take time for this to happen and their main focus will be elsewhere for awhile. I don’t think any of us will complain too much if they give first attention to homelessness, mental health, the minimum wage and the housing crisis.

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director