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After unveiling a brand new look and identity, Whānau Mārama: New Zealand International Film Festival has announced the highly-anticipated programme for its online and in cinema programme.

Congratulations to all of the Directors & Editors Guild of NZ members who have been selected to play in the 2020 festival! We strongly encourage you to support these filmmakers and your film community by packing out limited cinema screenings or renting Kiwi films to enjoy at home. DEGNZ members are eligible for concession prices where offered.

The Girl on the Bridge

Directed by member and NZ Arts Laureate Leanne Pooley and edited by DEGNZ board member Margot Francis, The Girl on the Bridge follows the inspiring journey of 21-year-old Jazz Thornton during the pivotal two-year period she was emerging out of her own struggles with suicide to become a powerful advocate for mental health.

The feature documentary is set to have its world premiere at NZIFF on July 25, 4pm at ASB Waterfront Theatre, then available online and in select venues.

 

The Girl on the Bridge

New Zealand’s Best 2020

This year, director Tusi Tamasese was the guest curator for this competitive short film programme, selecting the top six finalists. Four of the six feature the talents of DEGNZ members.

Set in 1973, Oranges & Lemons tells a bullied girl’s story to find her voice in the strangest place, directed by Robyn Grace and edited by Kerri Roggio.

Anna Duckworth‘s Pain, Claire van Beek‘s Daniel and Cian Elyse White‘s debut short Daddy’s Girl (Kōtiro) were made through the NZ Film Commission’s Fresh Shorts initiative. Pain explores a young girl’s earth-shattering realisation that her father is not invincible and is edited by member Brendon Chan.

Daniel will have its NZ premiere at Whānau Mārama after its world premiere at MIFF and in competition selection for Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival. The film was edited by John Gilbert and member Conan Mornard-Stott.

Cut by Annie Collins, Daddy’s Girl (Kōtiro) is a story about the powerful love between a father and his daughter in the face of a painful truth.

The programme will be in cinema at select venues or online from July 26 – August 1. If you watch NZ’s Best, make sure you vote for the Audience Choice Award.

 

Oranges and Lemons, Pain, Daniel, Daddy's Girl (Kōtiro)

Ngā Whanaunga Māori Pasifika Shorts 2020

For the first time, Ngā Whanaunga will be a competitive programme. Purea is written and directed by Kath Akuhata-Brown. Māori elder Hamo must bear the burden of carrying the spirits of her ancestors to their sacred mountain.

Ngā Whanaunga will premiere in cinema on July 26 and is available to watch online from July 27 – 2 August.

 

Purea

Kiwi Shorts

Kiwi Shorts is a curation of six New Zealand shorts that the Festival promises will put a smile on your face. Garage Stories: A Strange Collective Experience of Isolation, directed by Catherine Bisley, captures our nation’s recent experience under Level 4 lockdown.

Two nine-year-old girls find an enterprising way to satisfy their craving for ice cream in Ruby Abbott HarrisTriple Scoop. The programme also features Missy Fishy from director Erin Murphy – a whimsical tale about Miss Fish, a super mum, who struggles to tame her otherworldly urges.

Available to rent from August 1 – 7.

 

Garage Stories, Triple Scoop, Missy Fishy

 

Tickets for the Festival’s premiere screenings go on sale from July 10 and rental options can be purchased from the first available screening date, starting July 25. If you’re planning to watch at home, NZIFF suggests you start getting ready: set up your account, test, browse and start planning.

Tema Pua
Events & Marketing Manager

NZIFF 2019

Tonight, the New Zealand International Film Festival opens and with that, we congratulate members of the Directors & Editors Guild of NZ who have films in this year’s programme.

For My Father’s Kingdom

For My Father’s Kingdom premieres at home at the Civic Theatre after its Berlinale world premiere earlier this year. This debut feature documentary is co-directed by Vea Mafile’o (DEGNZ) and Jeremiah Tauamiti, and follows the story of Vea’s father Saia Mafile’o. The film is edited by Guild board member Margot Francis.

Vea and Jeremiah were part of our Documentary Editing Masterclass with their film in 2017 with US editor Doug Blush.

Join them for a Q+A after at screenings in Auckland and Wellington (August 10). Flicks also asked the directors eight questions about their film.

 

For My Father's Kingdom

New Zealand’s Best 2019

Congratulations to our members whose short films have been selected by Jane Campion for the only competitive programme at NZIFF, New Zealand’s Best 2019. Egg Cup Requiem is co-directed by DEGNZ’s Prisca Bouchet with Nick Mayow. Krystal is edited by Cushla Dillon and Hinekura is the new film from director Becs Arahanga about a young woman’s rite of passage upon her first menstruation in 1600s Aotearoa.

Tickets are officially selling fast for the Auckland screening on Saturday 27 July.

 

Egg Cup Requiem, Krystal, Hinekura

Ngā Whanaunga Māori Pasifika Shorts 2019

Ngā Whanaunga features Liliu, edited by former DEGNZ president Peter Roberts and Rū, cut by longtime board member Annie Collins.

Ways to See is written and directed by Jessica Sanderson, edited by Anastasia Doniants and made under Fresh 30. We do love a DEGNZ director-editor team up. Ways to See follows the attempts of a young Māori girl to reconnect with her absent father. Anastasia Doniants is also the editor on a second film here, Ani.

 

Liliu, Ways to See, Ru, Ani

Short Connections

Already sold out in Auckland and Wellington, Short Connections includes director Armagan Ballantyne’s collaboration with Toi Whakaari: NZ Drama School, Hush. Walk a Mile is edited by Janine Frei, and Memory Foam by editor Chia Hsu.

Across all the shorts programmes, it’s exciting to see so many Guild editors with work playing at this year’s festival.

 

Hush, Walk a Mile, Memory Foam

Herbs: Songs of Freedom

The curtains will close on the Auckland NZIFF programme with the World Premiere of Herbs: Songs of Freedom, an affectionate tribute to the iconic Kiwi band Herbs. The documentary is the latest editing collaboration between DEGNZ board member Francis Glenday and director/editor Tearepa Kahi, following POI E: The Story of our Song. POI E opened NZIFF 2016 and was nominated for Best Documentary Editor at the Rialto Channel NZ Film Awards.

Herbs: Songs of Freedom is bound to be another uplifting (and super catchy) local cinematic pleasure.

 

Herbs: Songs of Freedom

 

As a film community, support your fellow filmmakers and enjoy your time at NZIFF!

Members, don’t forget you can receive discounts on select screenings and the Masterclass with Thom Zimny. Check your inbox for the DEGNZ discount code in current newsletters.

Tema Pua
Events & Marketing Manager

Daffodils is a bittersweet love story told with beautiful re-imaginings of iconic New Zealand songs. Directed by DEGNZ member David Stubbs, the musical stars Rose McIver, George Mason and Kimbra.

Catch the film at this Rialto Film Talk screening as it first arrives in cinemas! We’ll be joined by writer Rochelle Bright for a half-hour Q&A after. She has had major success with this screenplay as a stage show that’s been performed all over the country and now it’s hitting the big screen.

Screenlink: The Making of Daffodils

Join DEGNZ and SPADA on March 13 for a relaxed evening with guests director David Stubbs and producer Richard Fletcher.

David and Richard will share on the trials and tribulations, plusses and pleasures of making Kiwi musical Daffodils. The film had its world premiere on Valentine’s Day at the Embassy Theatre in Wellington, and opens in NZ cinemas on March 21.

WHEN:  Wed 13 March, 6PM
WHERE:  Random Group – The Hub, 43 Hanson Street, Mt Cook, Wellington

Drinks BYO

DEGNZ / SPADA members – Free
Non-members – $5 koha appreciated

A joint event between the Directors and Editors Guild of NZ and the Screen Production and Development Association of NZ. 

Event Registration

Please register your attendance.

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In The Zone film

Director Robyn Paterson and Terrance Wallace, founder of the InZone Project, share on the process of making their 2018 feature documentary In The Zone. The film follows Terrance’s journey to establish first a home for minority teens in New Zealand’s most sought after school zone, and then in his own community back in Chicago with political and racial tensions rising in the USA.

Throughout its powerful narrative, In The Zone raises poignant questions about education, privilege, diversity, and cycles of inequality across the Western world.

 

“You are pulling people together and having to get the trust and build the trust with people from really different walks of life, really different ends of the political spectrum, different ends of the socio-economic spectrum. For me, as a filmmaker, I think my biggest job was building those relationships.” – Robyn Paterson

 

This event was part of the Film Talk Series, presented by DEGNZ and Rialto Cinemas in Auckland.